Guide: How to Say Hello in Nepali (with Audio)

Greetings are an essential part of any language, and learning how to say hello in Nepali can help you connect with the people of Nepal and make lasting connections. In this guide, we will explore both formal and informal ways to greet someone in Nepali, with audio pronunciations, tips, and examples. Let’s dive in!

Formal Greetings

When it comes to formal greetings in Nepali, using appropriate words and phrases is crucial. Here are a few options:

  1. Namaste: This is the most common formal greeting in Nepali. It’s a respectful way to say hello and is used throughout the day. The word is pronounced as “NAH-mas-tay.” Give it a try with the audio pronunciations below:
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  2. Dhanyabad: This phrase means “thank you” but can also be used to show formal respect while greeting someone. Pronounced as “DHAHN-yuh-baad,” it can be an excellent choice to thank someone for their time. Give it a listen:
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  3. Kasto chha hajur/lai: Literally meaning “how are you,” this phrase is used as a polite form of greeting. It can be pronounced as “KAS-toh chha HAH-jur-lai.” Here’s the audio pronunciation:
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Informal Greetings

Informal greetings are commonly used in casual settings. They allow you to connect on a more personal level with native Nepali speakers. Here are some examples:

  1. Namaskar: Similar to “namaste,” this word is used informally and can be pronounced as “NAH-mus-kar.” Listen to the audio below:
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  2. Ke cha hajur/lai: This phrase is an informal way of asking “how are you.” It can be pronounced as “KEH chha HAH-jur-lai.” Give it a listen:
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  3. Thik chha: An informal response to “how are you” is “thik chha,” which means “I’m fine.” The pronunciation is “THICK chha.” Listen to the audio below:
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Tips for Greeting in Nepali

To make your greetings more authentic and respectful, consider the following tips:

  • Smile: A warm smile can make a significant difference when greeting someone in Nepal. It shows your sincerity and friendliness.
  • Use proper titles: Addressing someone with respect can go a long way. Use “dai” for elder brothers, “didi” for elder sisters, and “ji” as a form of respect for elderly individuals. For example, “Namaste, dai!”
  • Show interest in the person’s well-being: Asking about their day or well-being can demonstrate that you genuinely care.
  • Practice pronunciation: Use the provided audio pronunciations to practice the correct way to say each greeting. Pay attention to stress, intonation, and emphasis.

Example Conversations

Let’s take a look at a couple of example conversations incorporating the greetings we’ve learned:

Person A: Namaste, dai! Kasto chha?

Person B: Namaskar, thik chha. Timile kasto chhau?

Person A: Ma pani thik chhu. Dhanyabad!

Person B: Dhanyabad hajur!

Person A: Namaste! Ke cha hajur?

Person B: Ke cha! Tapaiko kasto chha?

Person A: Ma ni ramailo chhu. Ke gariraheko?

Person B: Ma pani thikai gariraheko chu. Dhanyabad!

Remember, the Nepali people appreciate the effort put into learning their language, so don’t be afraid to practice your greetings and engage in conversations.

With this comprehensive guide on how to say hello in Nepali, you are well-equipped to greet the people of Nepal formally and informally. Use these greetings, practice your pronunciation, and embrace the warm and welcoming nature of Nepali culture. Namaste!

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