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Guide: How to Say “Close Your Eyes” in Hindi

Learning how to say “close your eyes” in different languages can be an exciting way to explore diverse cultures. In this guide, we’ll delve into the Hindi language and provide you with formal and informal expressions to use when instructing someone to close their eyes. We’ll also offer tips, examples, and regional variations where necessary. Let’s get started!

Formal Way to Say “Close Your Eyes” in Hindi

When addressing someone in a formal setting, such as in a professional or respected environment, you can use the phrase “apne aankhen band karein” to convey the instruction to close their eyes. Let’s break down this expression:

  • Apne: This is the reflexive pronoun “yourself.”
  • Aankhen: This refers to “eyes.”
  • Band: It means “close.”
  • Karein: This is the formal imperative form of the verb “to do.”

So, when instructing someone formally to close their eyes, you would say, “Apne aankhen band karein.”

Informal Way to Say “Close Your Eyes” in Hindi

In casual or informal situations, it’s common to use the phrase “apni aankhen band kar” to instruct someone to close their eyes. Let’s break down this informal expression:

  • Apni: This is the reflexive pronoun “yourself.”
  • Aankhen: It refers to “eyes.”
  • Band: It means “close.”
  • Kar: This is the informal imperative form of the verb “to do.”

To ask someone informally to close their eyes, you would say, “Apni aankhen band kar.”

Examples:

Let’s look at a few examples to help you understand how to use these phrases:

Formal Situation:

Teacher: “Apne aankhen band karein, please.” (Close your eyes, please.)

Informal Situation:

Friend: “Apni aankhen band kar, yaar.” (Close your eyes, buddy.)

Regional Variations

Hindi is a vibrant language spoken across different regions of India. While the formal and informal ways mentioned earlier are widely understood, regional variations may exist. Here are a few such variations:

1. In Northern India (specifically the states of Punjab, Haryana, and Delhi):

A phrase commonly used in these regions to say “close your eyes” informally is “apne akhan band kar.”

2. In Western India (specifically the state of Gujarat and parts of Rajasthan and Maharashtra):

In these regions, people often use the variation “apni aanko bandh kar” in informal settings to instruct someone to close their eyes.

3. In Southern India (specifically the state of Karnataka and parts of Tamil Nadu and Kerala):

In the southern regions, a common informal expression is “ninnade kaNugalu tuppuko.” This phrase is primarily spoken in Kannada, the language of Karnataka.

Concluding Thoughts

Now you know how to say “close your eyes” in Hindi both formally and informally. Use “apne aankhen band karein” in formal situations and “apni aankhen band kar” in informal situations to convey the instruction. Remember the regional variations if you find yourself in specific parts of India. This language skill will serve you well when interacting with Hindi speakers, deepening cultural connections, or simply impressing friends. Happy learning!

Written by Judy Leona

Namaste! I'm Judy, a passionate linguist who loves everything about the Hindi language. Besides devising comprehensive guides to teach Hindi, I love cooking traditional Indian cuisine, reciting Bollywood dialogues and playing cricket. You can always engage me in theological discussions, as I have a deep affection for 'Guru Purnima', or ask me about the Hindi translation of 'summer', my favourite season. Mera manna hai ki bhasha samajhna, duniya ko samjhna hai! (I believe understanding language is understanding the world!). Let's explore the beauty of Hindi together!

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  1. The South Indian phrase – “ninnade kaNugalu tuppuko.” is wrong. “tuppuko” is not a word in kannada.

    Informally, we’d say “ninna kannu muchko”.
    Ninna – your
    Kannu – eye
    Muchko – close

    Kannu is singular eye, kannugalu is plural meaning eyes. But, when we speak we use singular.

    Formally and with respect we’d say “nimma kannugalannu mucchikolli”

    I’m a native kannada speaker.

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